Сообщение 20 окт 2018, 11:22

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This year’s Super Bowl ads ran the gamut from tame humor to … tame messages about social causes.

After a divisive year Authentic Blake McLaughlin Jersey , advertisers during the Big Game worked overtime to win over audiences with messages that entertained and strove not to offend. The slapstick humor and sexual innuendo that used to be commonplace during Super Bowl ad breaks were nowhere in sight.

Instead, Budweiser , as always the largest advertiser during the game, eschewed the usual puppies and Clydesdales to showcase employees that send water to places in need. Verizon showed people thanking first responders who saved them. And Tide tried to make people laugh (and perhaps forget about its Tide Pod problem ) with a humorous series of ads that starred ”Stranger Things”’ actor David Harbour.

”This is a year where people are feeling a little frayed around the edges because the divisive political environment on both sides,” said Kelly O’Keefe, a professor at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Brandcenter. ”They want to feel like there’s something still good in the world.”

While the Philadelphia Eagles bested the New England Patriots in a nailbiter on the field, advertisers were fighting a similar battle to win over the hearts and minds of viewers. It’s the largest live stage for advertising all year, so advertisers brought their A-game.

Tide took a novel approach with ads each quarter that poked fun at typical Super Bowl ads. Harbour popped up in familiar-looking ads that appear to be about different products: a car, an insurance company, jewelry and Old Spice (another P&G product). The twist? They’re really all Tide ads, because there are no stains on anyone’s clothing.

Tame comedy like the Tide ad was a theme throughout the night. In a year that saw the (hash)MeToo movement shine a spotlight on sexual harassment, the vast majority of ads sill starred men but there weren’t any that focused on scantily-clad women or sexual innuendo, save for an awkwardly dancing – and fully dressed – woman in a Diet Coke ad.

Comedian Keegan Michael-Key cut through complex jargon to put things plainly in a humorous ad for Rocket Mortgage by Quicken Loans. When a restaurant patron is confused by what a ”beef-protein gluten-free pate” is, he explains: ”It’s a burrito, filled with plants pretending to be meat.”

An Amazon ad showcased different celebrities – including actress Rebel Wilson, actor Anthony Hopkins, singer Cardi B and chef Gordon Ramsay – filling in as the voice of Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant.

M&M’s featured Danny DeVito as a human M&M. And Mountain Dew and Doritos staged an epic hip-hop lip sync battle between actors Morgan Freeman and Peter Dinklage. The two synced to Missy Elliott and Busta Rhymes, respectively.

”There’s a reason so many marketers are using celebrity combined with comedy – because it breaks through the clutter, delivers the message and gets buzz,” said Aaron Shapiro, CEO of ad agency Huge.

An ad for Blacture, rapper Pras’ new media platform, was one of the few ads to make an overtly political statement. It showed an African-American man standing alone on stage with tape over his mouth and a blindfold on his eyes. ”Blacture. Be celebrated. Not Tolerated,” text on the screen read. And T-Mobile’s ad showed babies and enlisted Kerry Washington for a voiceover that talked about equality.

”The (T-Mobile) message is terrific but all the way through, if you asked consumers who the ad is for, nobody would know,” said Kimberly Whitler, marketing professor at the University of Virginia.

That kind of attempt to connect brands to social causes was a big theme of the night. Charles Taylor, a marketing professor at Villanova University, said a fifth of all Super Bowl ads featured causes, compared with just 6 percent last year.

Toyota kicked things off by depicting the story of Lauren Woolstencroft, a Paraolympic skier who was born missing her left arm below the elbow as well as both legs below the knees, to promote its Paralympic sponsorship.

Budweiser showcased employees from its Cartersville, Georgia, brewery as they canned water to send to places in need like Puerto Rico and California.

Hyundai showcased its donations to fight pediatric cancer by bringing real Hyundai owners into a room during the pre-game Super Bowl festivities and letting them meet cancer survivors. Hyundai donates each time someone buys one of its cars.

”There’s a lot of research that says millennials really like it when brands link themselves to causes,” said Taylor. ”It’s just refreshing for a lot of people to see these unifying types of messages by the advertiser.”

But advertisers can stumble in these efforts when the connection seems tenuous. There was some negative reaction when Fiat Chrysler’s Ram trucks ad featured a speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. The commercial, timed to the 50th anniversary of the speech, showed people doing good deeds like giving out food to the needy and rescuing a boy from a fire.

”Everyone was offended,” said Zach Mann, who watched the game in Venice, California Authentic Rasmus Dahlin Jersey , with a group of 15 thirtysomethings. ”It seems insensitive. We know it’s Black History Month, but using an American hero to sell a Dodge was off-putting.” (Ram trucks are no longer affiliated with the Dodge brand.)

Instead, it was the humorous ads like the Tide spots that won that group over.

”Everyone seems to be moving into more comedy, quirky, unique (ideas), which my friends and I all are enjoying way more” than past years, M Kevin Hart fessed up he was tipsy when he tried to crash the Super Bowl stage and celebrate with his hometown Philadelphia Eagles when they hoisted the Lombardi Trophy. The pint-sized funnyman ran into a no-nonsense security guard who refused to allow Hart, wearing an Eagles letterman’s jacket, access to the stage that was set up on the field.

Unlike the Eagles, Hart’s Super Bowl celebration would have to be held elsewhere.

”To all the kids out there, I just want to say don’t drink. When alcohol is in your system, you do dumb stuff,” he later said on an Instagram video.

Hart, the Grammy-nominated star, would have fit in fine in Philly.

Unruly Eagles fans climbed light poles, took trust falls off a hotel canopy, flipped cars, busted store windows and even streaked down city streets shortly after their team won the Super Bowl.

It was time to party.

Eagles fans are just getting started.

The city announced that the Super Bowl parade will be Thursday, starting at 11 a.m. at Broad Street near the stadiums. It will move north along the city’s main thoroughfare, past City Hall and finish at the art museum’s ”Rocky Steps.” The National Weather Service says Thursday will be mostly sunny with a high of 34 degrees. Rain and snow are expected in the city Wednesday.

Beer bashes and drunken revelry are in the forecast for the parade.

Eagles fans had suffered through five decades – through Buddy, Reggie and T.O. – without a Super Bowl championship and they want this celebration to go down as one to remember.

That is, if they can remember, in the wake of an alcohol-fueled stupor.

Revelers along the parade route will be able to indulge in free Bud Light at two dozen bars, thanks to a promise the beer maker made to Eagles offensive tackle Lane Johnson before the season.

Revelers shot off fireworks, drivers beeped their horns and Philadelphians young and old descended Sunday night on Broad Street, the main thoroughfare that last hosted a major championship parade in 2008

Eagles fans are expected to stuff city streets in record numbers. The Flyers have long claimed more than 2 million fans went wild down Broad each year for the 1974 and 1975 Stanley Cup winning teams. Sixers fans mobbed the streets for Dr. J and the 1983 NBA champion 76ers.

And Phillies star outfielder Pat Burrell led a championship procession in 2008, riding a horse-drawn carriage and pumping his fists down Broad. Next came eight flatbed trucks filled with waving players and other members of the Phillies organization, including the Phanatic.

Throngs in Phillies gear packed downtown sidewalks, making them almost impassable. Fans climbed trees, hung out of windows, watched from balconies, carried stepladders and stood on roofs to get a better view. The Phillies then greeted tens of thousands of fans who had watched the parade on big screens at the city’s baseball and football stadiums. The team first stopped at Lincoln Financial Field, where the Eagles play.

Now, the Linc isn’t just the site of another team’s rally – it’s the home of the Super Bowl champs.

The Super Bowl, though, was about an overzealous excuse for irresponsible behavior.

The Eagles are perhaps the city’s greatest passion, and the outpouring of support came in more forms than simply pouring one out. Grown men cried and hugged their fathers. Families bundled up and hit the streets to bang pots and pans and share the championship together. Some fans carried signs with names of loved ones no longer here in tribute for those who never got to cherish a Super Bowl title before death.

”I moved here in `94. I didn’t have a team back home (Louisville). The Eagles were my adopted team,” said 41-year-old Eagles fan Rob Ballenger. ”This city has an underdog culture and to rise above it right now is amazing. This city is at a turning point in so many ways.

”I made 100 new friends at the bar (Grace Tavern). Philly fans sometimes get a negative slant in the media, a negative reputation. But these are the best fans in the world, the most passionate.”

They’ll finally get their chance Thursday to celebrate the champion Eagles as one city, united in green.